Ken Globus

The Bird Whisperer

 

 

 

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Rock Island Argus

 

The Rock Island Argus


Posted online: September 11, 2005 9:54 PM
Print publication date: September 12, 05


 Relationships: a bird's eye view

By Janeť Jackson

jacksonj@qconline.com


 

When human relationships go awry couples seek a counselor. When the couple is a human and a pet bird, they call in Ken Globus, otherwise known as "The Bird
Whisperer."

Mr. Globus will turn the most cantankerous of birds into gentle creatures at the Quad Cities Parrot Society's Bird Fair 2005, set for Sept. 18 at the Milan Community Center, off U.S. 67 in Milan.

The first-ever bird fair will feature almost 20 local and regional bird vendors, along with local and regional avian veterinarians, said Brad Baldwin, QCPS president.

Mr. Globus, a long-time screenwriter, will give a free public demonstration at 1 p.m. He will tame several birds -- in just minutes.

He's been using and teaching his techniques for over 25 years. Mr. Globus has even tamed Blanche, a Panama Amazon parrot owned by director Steven Spielberg
and his wife, actress Kate Capshaw. His talents have also been featured in the Los Angeles Times and TV's "Inside Edition."

"It's just been a great trip, a great ride," Mr. Globus said in a telephone interview from his Los Angeles, home. "I have never done anything in my live that has this kind of power as far as reaching people. People in the bird world are an unusual bunch of people. (They're) very passionate about
animals."

He developed a calling for birds when his parents owned a tropical fish shop in the 1980s. He started a bird shop in the corner of the store. Back then, he learned that birds are scared of people.

It's that fear, coupled with their owners' fears, that leads to relationship breakdowns, he said.

During his four-hour workshops, he teaches owners "to read their own birds," using calmness and positive energy with techniques and exercises for owners to get their relationships on track. And owners who finally connect with their birds are often amazed, sometimes in tears, according to Mr. Globus.

"It's almost like group therapy because we're all pulling for each other," Mr. Globus said. "... When they turn, I feel it's a huge gift. It's a very emotional process."

A film crew will record his talents for a documentary at one of two workshops he will conduct in Davenport. The documentary, which has no title yet, will showcase his work as well as positive and negative criticism from critics, he
said.

The first workshop will be held at the Gymnastic Spectrum, 5330 Carey Ave., at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 18, right after the bird fair. The second workshop will be
at 4 p.m. Sept. 19, at Central Church of Christ, 4800 Northwest Blvd.

The cost is $100 with a bird, $50 without a bird. People who wish to attend with their birds must attend the second workshop, since space in the first workshop is filled.
 

Space is available in the first workshop for those who want to attend without a bird. To reserve a spot, call Parrot Society board member Kitty James at (563) 326-1769.

Community Center, near Camden Park and U.S. 67, Milan

Admission is free with a suggested $3 donation. Owners are welcome to bring their birds.

 Web site:
www.qcparrot.org